An outgrowth of the training template concept, a racking template is a racking tool used in place of a traditional rigid ball rack for pool or snooker balls, consisting of a very thin , e.g. 0.14 mm (0.0055 in), sheet of material such as paper or plastic with holes into which object balls settle snugly against one another to form a tight rack (pack). The template is placed, stencil-like, in racking position , with the lead ball's hole directly over the center of the foot spot . The balls are then placed onto the template and arranged to settle into their holes, forming a tight rack . Unlike with a training template , the balls are not tapped to create divots, and instead the template is left in place until after the break shot at which time it can be removed (unless balls are still sitting on top of it). Manufacturers such as Magic Ball Rack insist that racking templates are designed "to affect the balls to a minimum", and while pro player Mika Immonen has endorsed that particular brand as a retail product, as of September 2010, no professional tours nor amateur leagues have adopted that or any other racking template . Although Magic Ball Rack implies development work since 2006, other evidence suggests invention, by Magic Ball Rack 's founder, in mid 2009, with product announcement taking place in September of that year.